210-551-0774 Call Now Get FREE Estimate Now
on Your Smartphone

Tag: safe driver

A shot looking down the side of a stopped bus, with kids getting on at the far end.
How much do you know about school zones?

It’s that time of year again – when your morning commute gets 10+ minutes longer because of school buses, parents, and teen drivers. But there’s one part of your commute you should be taking extra caution: School zones. These are areas near schools where kids may be walking across traffic to get to school.

While actual speed limits vary between school zones, there are a few rules you should be aware of that are always in effect while the lights are flashing.

Slow down, no matter what

While it may be tempting to speed through a seemingly deserted school zone, law enforcement is typically strict about school speed limits. Speeding through can also be dangerous to other vehicles that have slowed down and aren’t anticipating your high speed.

Regardless of the traffic and pedestrian situation, you can still be ticketed upwards of $215.

Keep an eye out for pedestrians

Just because you don’t see children in a school zone doesn’t mean there aren’t any nearby. Children can be harder to see because of their size and can be hidden by trees, power boxes, or other cars. Some kids bike to school as well.

All cell phone activity is prohibited

A woman talks on a cell phone while driving
All cell phone use is banned in school zones.

While it’s not illegal to use a cell phone while driving in Texas, with the exception of texting, school zones have much stricter rules. Drivers are not allowed to use a cell phone at all while driving through a school zone. This is often overlooked by drivers who aren’t aware of stricter school zone laws. The fine for using a cell phone in a school zone? Expect a bill for $229.

This law extends to all school property as well. If you’re in the school parking lot, keep the phone down until you’re parked.

Don’t pass a stopped car near school zones

A stopped car might mean they’re allowing a pedestrian to cross the street. Passing the stopped car without stopping to look first may result in hitting a pedestrian. Stop, let people fully cross the road before proceeding.

Do not block crosswalks

Again, a crosswalk is a safe way for pedestrians to cross the street. Sitting on the crosswalk blocks this safe space for pedestrians, causing them to go a different route that other drivers may not expect.

Respect the crossing guard

A crossing guard in a yellow safety vest holds up a stop sign to let middle schoolers cross the street
Crossing guards protect our kids from cars. Yield to their directions.

Crossing guards protect children and other pedestrians. If they are on the road, wait for them to get to the sidewalk before proceeding. Crossing guards are also placed at the most dangerous intersections for pedestrians, which means that cars need to take extra caution to provide a safe area for everyone.

Stop for school buses

If a school bus stops with its lights on, whether in a school zone or not, be sure to stop – no matter what side of the street you are on. Flashing lights mean children are either getting on or off the bus. Kids are especially unpredictable and could run out unexpectedly or be obscured from sight. Wait for the bus to start moving again and turn off its lights before proceeding.

For more helpful driving tips, follow us on Facebook.

 

girl and woman laugh in each other's face with a black backdrop
Getting your teen to drive safely isn’t as hard as you think.

As a driver, you know there are a ton of distractions that can take your eyes and mind away from the road. Your teen may be aware of these distractions, but may not know how serious they can affect their driving.

Drivers under 20 are at the highest risk of distracted driving accidents, largely thanks to phones. Cell phone users are 5.36 times more likely to get into an accident. In 2017, 100,687 crashes happened on Texas roads due to distracted driving.

One of the most important conversations you can have with your teen is about safe driving. Here are a few ways to positively encourage them to do so.

1. Lead by example

Kids learn behavior from their role models. They aren’t likely to stay off their phone behind the wheel if they see you on your phone behind the wheel. The earlier you can set an example, the better. If your teen has often seen you on your phone while driving already, tell them that you want to practice safer driving with them.

You can have them encourage you to stay off your phone or engage in other distracting behaviors while you drive, as you’ll do the same for them.

2. Give them the tools to succeed

Visual of the Drive Mode app that has big buttons with simple functions like calling and playing audio
Apps like Drivemode can simplify the most commonly used phone features for easy access and less time with your eyes off the road.

There are several apps that can help reduce your teen’s distractions. If your teen uses their phone for music or Bluetooth calling, they probably won’t want to put it away completely. Instead, help them set up an app to lock certain features or allow hands-free control.

Keeping your teen’s phone on a mount also helps them keep their eyes close to the road and minimizes the time their hands are off the wheel should they use it.

This isn’t the perfect solution, but especially as we are increasingly depending on constant-communication, your teen may be less inclined to turn off and stow their phone. But this way, you can allow them to use it in a much safer manner.

3. Peer influence

Peer influence also plays a part in distracted driving. Others in the car can be a positive or negative influence on the driver. A 2015 AT&T study showed that 85% of participants would download an app to block their phone notifications if one of their “top 5” closest communicators asked them to. Many drivers are receptive to those they care about – if only those people asked them to change their behavior.

Talk to your teen and their friends about how they engage with one another. Encourage them to support one another to make safe driving habits. It’s also important to talk to them about being aware of their behavior in the car to support safe driving.

4. Positive reinforcement

a young driver in a red checkered shirt sits with their hands on the wheel.
Encourage your teen driver with positive reinforcement.

New drivers hear a lot of negative comments concerning what they’re doing wrong. While this is often vital, they also need to hear positive reinforcement of their safe driving skills.

Both on and off the road, don’t be afraid to compliment your teen on something they did well. It could be the way they maintained the speed limit. Or how they told their friend to text them when they get home safely.

Even if they don’t seem receptive, small encouragements can help them see safe driving as an asset instead of an annoyance.

Some safe driving apps, like San Antonio-based Safe 2 Save, also reward you for staying off your phone, which also positively reinforces attentive driving. You can encourage them to earn rewards at local businesses, to give your teen incentive to stay off their phone.

You can even do it as a family and compete to see who can get the most safe-driving rewards. Again, your teen will have their good habits positively reinforced.

5. Practice practice practice

This is obvious, but for your teen to get better at driving, they need to spend more time on the road. Offer to let them drive if it’s just the two of you, and take them out to practice in heavier traffic. Often, teens don’t encounter difficult driving situations until they’re on their own. Having them encounter difficult driving situations with you there can help them in the long run.

For more teen driving safety, follow ProCare Collision on Instagram.

A person stands behind the hood of a grey car looking at the engine. They are stopped on the side of a small road surrounded by green grass.
Is it time for a new car yet? Costly repairs are a big factor in many car owners’ decision to buy new.

You love your car. You’ve been taking good care of it for years, but after the last accident, you’re not sure how much more repair you’re willing to pour into it. But buying a new is also a huge financial commitment. Here are a few considerations as to whether or not you want to commit to a new vehicle.

Safety

Obviously, newer cars are safer. They have the latest technology to keep you and your vehicle out of harm’s way. If your car is more than 5 years old, compare the safety features of your car to newer vehicles. Some things can be added on to your current vehicle, but others cannot. Features like automatic emergency braking, backup cameras, and blind-spot monitoring are almost standard safety now. If there’s a serious gap in the safety of your car and newer vehicles, it’s probably time to buy a new one.

Also, if you are looking for your teen driver, safer cars are the way to go. Anything that helps an inexperienced driver navigate the road will benefit them.

Saving money

If you find yourself at the repair shop often, you may feel like your car is costing you more than it’s worth. However, the cost of a new car is much more burdensome. Not only would you probably be paying more in monthly payments, but you’ll also pay more in insurance and registration fees.

A new car loses about 20 percent of its value in a year. This can leave you “upside down” in payments before long: You’ll owe more than what it’s worth. While this is a normal part of getting a new car, you’ll likely be stuck with it when this happens – for better or worse.

However, if your current vehicle is a gas guzzler you’ll likely save money on fuel by switching to something more efficient. This would be a great reason to trade in your vehicle.

Peace of mind

A pair of legs with white tennis shoes stick out of the drivers window of a car.
Knowing you have a safe vehicle with a current warranty can help you enjoy your car rather than avoid wearing it down.

Sometimes the worry of an old car breaking down is not worth holding out to buy a new one. Repairing an old problem doesn’t guarantee another major problem won’t happen sooner than later.

You may just be fed up with an ongoing problem in your vehicle: An annoying engine noise, a broken radio, worn upholstery…there is a multitude of everyday annoyances and worries getting a new car can fix. Constant trips to the repair shop are stressful and can leave you several days without your vehicle.

Buying new comes with the peace of mind that you’ll probably not be in the shop for a repair. And if you do, you’ll probably have a warranty to cover it for several years to come.

Sentiment

If you’ve had a car a long time, you may have a sentimental attachment to it. Saying goodbye can feel like abandoning an old friend. While this isn’t necessarily a big reason to keep the vehicle, it may influence a decision to keep your old car. Think about it this way: Sentimental value makes the car more valuable to you than it would to anyone else.

Making a decision

While multiple factors have to be considered in your decision, there are a few instances we’d recommend buying new:

a woman smiles thoughtfully behind the wheel of a car
Your commute doesn’t have to cause you stress. Use these mindful tips to help you have a happy drive.

 

Let’s be honest. Central Texas’ worst drawback is the traffic. Whether you’re driving into San Antonio, Austin, or just trying to get through town in San Marcos, congestion is abound. That’s why it’s smart to have a plan to kick the stress for your mid-week traffic jam.

Not only will calming down help you cope with a frustrating traffic situation, but people who are stressed or angry tend to exhibit reckless driving habits. This is dangerous for you and the cars around you.

Here are a few ways you can de-stress behind the wheel and get some enjoyment out of an otherwise stressful commute.

1. Listen to a podcast or audiobook

Preferably, your listening material shouldn’t be high-energy or aggressive, as we can often channel into our behavior. Instead, listen to something that takes your mind (partly) off the traffic around you. Listening to engaging audio could help your mind stay alert while distancing yourself from the stress at hand.

2. Turn your phone off

Someone behind the wheel looks at a smartphone.
Turn your phone off while driving. Alerts can be stressful, especially while you’re paying attention to the road.

Using a phone while driving is illegal in some places, but ultimately your phone is a major stress machine. If you’re driving and hear several alerts going off, you’ll likely feel an urgency to check it. Turning it off doesn’t give you the option to feel this way.

3. Do some yoga

Yes, you read that right. Practice some yoga as you drive. Some stretches are best done when the car is fully stopped, while some, like practicing your breathing, can be done while driving. Start by sitting up straight. Roll your neck and stretch your muscles gently, and slowly. Focus on your body and you’ll soon feel calmer.

4. Let it go

Sometimes we let ourselves get carried away. Who hasn’t let a bit of road rage fester while you’re driving? But the key to staying calm isn’t not to feel that way. It’s to choose to let those feelings subside. Anger is a natural reaction when someone cuts you off, but to reject that feeling will help you stay calm and focused. Remember that you have no control over the actions of other drivers. The best you can do is observe and react as safely as you can.

5. Take a break

An interior shot of a cafe with communal seating and people sitting and working on computers in the background.
Stop by a cafe to break up your commute and take a breather. Getting off the road for a few minutes can lower stress.

If the traffic is making you feel anxious or too stressed, you can always pull over if you need to. Try stopping at a coffee shop or convenience store for a snack and a proper stretch. You might even hang around for a bit while traffic subsides.

close-up of a tire on a black vehicle
Taking care of your tires can prevent accidents.

Maintaining good quality tires on a vehicle is something car owners must do. Insufficient tread or air pressure leads to more than just a flat tire. In 2017, tire-related crashes resulted in 738 fatalities nationwide. While the number of tire-related crashes has dropped in the past decade, they can still happen and cause serious damage.

Proper tire maintenance is one of many steps car owners can take to prevent an accident.

Proper tire tread

The tread on tires can vary depending on the type of tire and the type of vehicle. You want enough tire tread to allow water on the road to go through the tread. This gives your car traction.

There is a quick test you can do to check your tread. Insert the penny in the tread with Lincoln’s head pointed down into the tread. If you see the top of Lincoln’s head, it’s time to replace the worn tires on your vehicle.

If you don’t have change, look for the tread wear indicator bars which are located on several areas of the tire.

Check the tire pressure

The tire pressure for every vehicle can vary but is typically between 30 and 35 psi. Make a habit of checking your tire pressure routinely and it is especially important to do this before you drive on slick roads.

While most newer vehicles are equipped with tire sensors, you do not want to always rely on that in case the sensors malfunction. Under-inflated and damaged tires are leading contributors to a blowout, which can result in a serious collision.

For more car care advice, follow us on Facebook.

A glowing blue outline of a car sits on a reflective black surface.
A lot is changing in car technology, making repair more complicated than ever.

You may first be attracted to a new vehicle model because of the exterior design. Today’s cars consist of more than just looks and how it rides though. A variety of technology packages now available keep everyone in the vehicle safe. Technology and certified collision repair go hand-in-hand with new cars.

What is certified collision repair?

Certified Collision Repair means your body shop makes sure it’s employees regularly train with the manufacturers. Each manufacturer has different standards and specifications of repair. The certification makes sure techs are on the same page with the manufacturer about how to repair their vehicles – not just functionally, but exceptionally.

What does it have to do with my new car?

With increasingly advanced technology, techs need more training to keep up-to-date on how to repair that new technology. Manufacturer certifications help them understand new changes to the car’s body and technology.

If an accident damages a feature such as the automatic emergency braking (AEB), the technician must know how to repair it to the manufacturer’s standards so it will operate safely again. Repairing it with older methods may not fully repair the damage, or even make it worse.

Everyone gets in accidents, unfortunately. If you get in one, you’ll need a body shop that will get the job done correctly the first time.

When you’re looking for the right shop, ask questions. You should ask the auto body shop if the technicians are certified with your vehicle’s brand. Then find out how often the technicians train. Knowing that your body shop is up-to-date on training will give you extra assurance when you drop off your vehicle.

For more car repair information, follow us on Facebook.

No parent wants their teen to have an accident and wind up searching for an auto body shop. Driving for the first time can come with mixed emotions for any teen. They can be extremely excited, nervous, or overwhelmed. Parents can also feel similar emotions as they teach a teen safe driving.

There are a few ways to demonstrate good driver responsibility to your teen.

stress safe teen driving to prevent visit to auto body shop san antonio tx

Drive by example

AAA recently surveyed driving instructors. According to the survey, parents today do not prepare their teen drivers as well as parents did a decade ago. The instructors reported parents setting bad examples through their own driving behaviors. Research shows that young drivers will mimic the driving of parents and other family members.

Remember when your child gets closer to learning how to drive to be aware of how you operate a vehicle. Re-familiarize yourself with traffic and safety rules. Reduce behaviors you wouldn’t want your teen driver to do. This includes reducing distractions like cell phone use and obeying the speed limit.

Having a soon-to-be driver in your car can help you get back in the practice of responsible driving.

Practice, practice, practice

As the saying goes, “Practice makes perfect.” The more experience that your teen can get behind the wheel will help your new driver respond better to a potential accident. It is better to expose them to different driving situations with you in the car next to them so they can learn from you can put your guidance into practice in the future.

Young drivers often do not get enough practice in inclimate weather, night driving, and heavy traffic – situations where they’re most likely to get into a crash.

Encouragement is important

Every parent knows that praise is helpful when their teen is doing the right thing, especially when they are driving safely behind the wheel. Positive reinforcement of good driving can be encouraging and help your teen build driving confidence.

But encouragement in other ways is also important. Have discussions with your teen to let him or her know it is a good thing to speak up if they don’t feel safe driving or to also speak up with their peers about unsafe driving. Sometimes discussing what to do or say in social situations can help your teen set boundaries (and a good example!) with other young drivers.

For more tips on safe teen driving, follow us on Facebook.

An outside view of two dash cameras attached near the top of a windshield.
Dash cameras are becoming increasingly popular, filming the outside or inside of a car while driving.

We live in a world where much of what we do in public is on camera. If you go inside a business, you may be on a security camera. When attending events, you may be in someone’s video from a smartphone. And now, more drivers use dash cameras than ever before. Many people use them in their personal vehicles to capture various perspectives while driving.

There is not a specific law in Texas that pertains to dash cameras. However, there are privacy and driving laws that drivers using a dash camera should know.

Privacy rights

With cameras that surround us in public and people using their smartphones, it is easy to forget that we do have rights to our privacy.

Recording video from a dash camera while driving is not against the law in San Antonio, as long as it is hands-free. Mount the camera on the dash and never maneuver it while driving. If you are recording audio, remember the privacy laws in Texas regarding consent to being recorded with audio.

Also, it is not against the law to record a traffic stop, or any interaction with police, in Texas.

Keep a clear view

If your dash camera is mounted on the dashboard or on your windshield, do not put it in a location that blocks your view. Make sure your camera doesn’t prevent you from seeing vital road signs, pedestrians, or other vehicles.

Also, never depend on a dash camera as your view for driving. The camera can serve as a different perspective of what you see while driving and can become an extra set of eyes, but should not be relied upon for safety.

Benefits of dash camera video for a collision center

Close-up of a front bumper and headlight, dented and misaligned.
Dash cameras can help drivers when talking to car repair technicians and their insurance.

Drivers who get into a wreck can provide the video footage to their body shop for repair technicians to review. Technicians can then have a better understanding of the impact to the car and possible damage.

The video can also be helpful for insurance agents, determining blame for an accident, or viewing your driving behaviors that may have caused the crash.

At ProCare Collision, a body shop in San Antonio, we have provided high quality collision repair to vehicles for more than 60 years. The more details you have regarding the accident can help our technicians provide the most accurate repairs to your car so you can get back on the road.

Visit us on Facebook for more car tips and safety information.

Call Us

210-551-0774